Monthly Archives: December 2022

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What’s News: A calendar of local events

Get your non-profit organization and church events in the Jacksonville Progress’s What’s News calendar free of charge by e-mailing your event information to editor@jacksonvilleprogress.com. The newspaper reserves the right to edit any submission for space and content.카지노사이트

NOTE: Some of the following events may be canceled at a later date. We have removed events that had been canceled as of press time.

Friday, Dec. 30 – Sunday, Jan. 1

Trail to Christ Cowboy Church, 5858 US 79 W., is hosting a youth retreat for students in sixth through twelfth grade beginning at 6 p.m Friday, Dec. 30 and ending at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 1. The New Year’s Youth Retreat will feature laser tag, scavenger hunt, rodeo and more. To register, use the link posted on the Trail to Christ Cowboy Church Facebook page. For more information, contact Janae Halbert at 903-521-5017.

Saturday, Dec. 31

Jacksonville Game Night will be hosted from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 31, at Postmasters Coffee, 402 E. US 79. Board games are provided, but participants are welcome to bring their own. The Chess Club will also meet during this time. Anyone with an interest in chess, regardless of skill level, is invited to participate.

Sunday, Jan. 1

The Lighthouse Church, located at 640 Dr. M. Roper Parkway in Bullard, invites the public to join the congregation in person at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 1 for a time of worship, prayer and communion and again at 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday, Jan. 2 through 7, on Facebook live for prayer and communion. The intent is to begin 2023 with a renewed focus on Jesus.

ONGOING

A city-wide prayer gathering is being hosted at 6 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at Hwy 69 Mission, 203 N. Jackson St. Believers of all denominations are invited to join together to seek God’s face and his purpose.바카라사이트

The Jacksonville Kiwanis Club meets weekly at noon on Thursdays at the Jacksonville College Library, 105 BJ Albritton Drive. For information on the Kiwanis Club, visit the website kiwanisclubjacksonville.org or their Facebook page.

Alanon Family Group meetings are held at 4 p.m. Thursdays at Trinity Episcopal Church, 1000 S. Jackson, in Jacksonville. If you love someone with a drinking addiction, Alanon can help you. There are no dues or fees. For more information, call Elizabeth at (903) 284-7311.

The Military Veteran Peer Network hosts regular meet and greet events 6-7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at 804 S. Main Street in Jacksonville. They also meet at 6 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month at the Lion’s Club building, 540 W. 6th St., in Rusk. The organization provides supportive fellowship for veterans and their families. For more information, contact Bradley Erickson, Peer Services Coordinator, at 903-721-2078.

REMEMBER OR HONOR THE VETERANS IN YOUR LIFE. The Jacksonville Garden Club is selling commemorative bricks for veterans, both past and present, as a fundraising project. Information to be included on each brick includes the name of the service member with his or her rank, branch of service and years served. The bricks will be placed at Buckner Park’s Patriotic Pathway. The cost is $50 per brick. To order, contact Sandra Dickerson at 903-339-1395.

Explore Jacksonville is seeking volunteers of all ages and abilities to help at Love’s Lookout Park. For more information, contact (903) 339-3320.

County Roads Rescue, located at 601 Woodlawn Ave. in Jacksonville is accepting clean, bagged aluminum can donations between 9 and 11 a.m. Monday through Friday at the shelter. Email countyroadsrescue@gmail.com to arrange a drop-off.

Cherokee County veterans are invited to apply for federal grant funds offered through Habitat for Humanity of Smith County as part of the Housing Assistance Council Affordable Housing for Rural Veterans Initiative. Funds will provide renovations to make veterans’ residences accessible, healthy and safe. To apply, visit www.smithcountyhabitat.org, or call (903) 595-6630.온라인카지노

indigenous

New EU anti-deforestation law falls short, indigenous leaders say

Indigenous leaders from rainforests from Brazil to Indonesia say a new European Union law preventing the import into the bloc of key commodities linked to deforestation is insufficient to protect forests and will do little to bolster indigenous rights.카지노사이트

The legislation, agreed upon last week, will force firms supplying palm oil, cattle, soy, coffee, cocoa, timber and rubber – as well as some derived products such as beef or furniture – to the EU market to prove their supply chains are not fuelling the destruction of forests.

Brazilian indigenous leader Dinamam Tuxa said the law would help stem rising rates of deforestation across most of the Amazon basin – which spans nine nations including Brazil – but stressed that he did not think it was broad enough in scope.

The legislation does not cover deforestation from biodiverse areas outside of rainforests, such as wetlands, semi-arid forests, and savannahs that are also major carbon sinks and help to stave off climate change, according to Tuxa.

“This law should have been more ambitious. It leaves behind other important biomes,” said Tuxa, head of the Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB), an indigenous umbrella organisation.

For example, products from 600,000 square kilometres (231,600 square miles) of land in Brazil’s Cerrado savanna – the fastest growing frontier of agricultural expansion in the country – would not be subject to the law, said the Cerrados Institute, a non-profit.

An EU commission will consider no later than one year after the law comes into force whether to extend the regulations to include other wooded land, and within a period of two years if the law should also be broadened to include other ecosystems.

Deforestation is responsible for about 10 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to climate scientists, and it is on the agenda at this week’s UN COP15 summit in Canada, where countries are seeking a global pact to protect nature.

Indigenous leaders said they are concerned that national laws protecting indigenous rights and local deforestation monitoring systems are not strong enough on their own to ensure the new EU law will be effectively implemented on the ground.

In Brazil, government agencies that can help monitor, verify and trace company supply chains to ensure compliance with the EU law must be strengthened after years of being undermined and underfunded by outgoing President Jair Bolsonaro, Tuxa said.

“There are many [government] monitoring mechanisms already in place in Brazil but nothing is working,” he said.

Brazil’s main environmental federal government enforcement agency, Ibama, and the indigenous affairs agency, Funai, have been particularly affected, he said.

‘Come up short’
The European Parliament’s lead negotiator Christophe Hansen has hailed the new EU measure as “innovative regulation”, and green groups hope it will significantly help protect fast-vanishing forests around the world.

Hansen’s office was unable to respond to a request for comment by deadline to criticisms of the EU law from indigenous leaders.

But in a statement following the announcement of the new law Hansen said “the rights of indigenous people, our first allies in fighting deforestation, are effectively protected.”

The legislation requires companies to produce a due diligence statement showing their supply chains are not contributing to the destruction of forests before they sell certain goods into the EU. Those who do not comply risk fines.바카라사이트

Although firms have to show that the rights of indigenous people were respected in their operations in commodity-producing nations, campaigners have raised concerns that this only applies to countries where those rights are already protected by national law.

Levi Sucre, an indigenous Bribri leader from Costa Rica, said he welcomed the EU law and its potential to tackle Latin America’s “alarming deforestation rates,” driven largely by the expansion of the agricultural frontier and monoculture farming.

But the legislation was “fragile”, he said, noting he feared it would put little extra pressure on governments in commodity-producing countries to ensure they respect the rights of indigenous people.

Across many Latin American countries, the rights of indigenous people are enshrined in state constitutions and local laws but are still too often flouted and ignored, Sucre added.

“Our rights are violated. The (EU) law isn’t going to change much for us in terms of access to justice and guaranteeing our rights,” said Sucre, who heads the Mesoamerican Alliance of Peoples and Forests (AMPB).

“There are shared economic interests between governments and companies. Who will verify that our rights are respected? That’s the big question,” Sucre said.

Indigenous rainforest leaders in Indonesia – the world’s top producer of palm oil and a leading exporter of coffee, rubber and cocoa – said national laws to protect the environment and indigenous land rights are not being implemented in practice.

The Global Alliance of Territorial Communities (GATC) – an alliance representing tropical forest peoples from more than 14 countries – said its indigenous leaders and members were “disappointed” the EU had not sufficiently strengthened their rights in its new legislation.

“The EU have placed our fate in the hands of the very governments that have violated our rights, criminalised our leaders and allowed an invasion of our territories,” the group said in a statement.

This story was published with permission from Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, climate change, resilience, women’s rights, trafficking and property rights. Visit https://www.context.news/온라인카지노

casino

The History of Casino

Roulette invented by Francois Blanc

The single-zero wheel of roulette was invented by Francois Blanc. He was a businessman and owner of the famed Monte Carlo casino. The single-zero roulette wheel provided better odds to players. The game was soon dubbed the Devil’s game due to its addictive nature.카지노사이트

Evolution of gambling games

Evolution is a company that offers casino games and services to operators. The company charges a fixed fee to its customers to use its services. The company offers a variety of services, including private tables, VIP services, and native-speaking dealers. Evolution’s goal is to make casino gambling an exciting and unique experience for customers. These services are aimed at increasing casino revenues and increasing loyalty among existing customers.

Early slot machines

Early slot machines were simple mechanical games. They featured fruit symbols and prizes were paid out in sweets and chewing gum. A similar machine named Operator Bell, manufactured by Herbert Mills, was available in salons and tobacconists. It was one of the earliest mass-produced slot machines, and it used the BAR symbol, based on the logo of the Bell-Fruit company.

Blackjack

Blackjack originated in casinos in France in the 1700s. It was originally known as “Vingt-et-Un” and was a variation on the French game Chemin de Fer. During the reign of King Louis XV, it was played by the French Royal Court.

Macau

Macau was once a sleepy fishing village, but the Portuguese soon took over and turned the area into a thriving port. Portuguese sailors flocked to the area to conduct their business. The city soon became a stop on the Silk Road, and Portuguese sailors anchored their ships and set up warehouses there. Macau fell under Portuguese rule in 1557, and the Portuguese stayed in the area until 1863. The city became a hub for lucrative sea trade, and Macau became one of the most important ports in the world.

Mirage Hotel and Casino opened by Steve Wynn

The Mirage was opened in 1989 and was built by casino mogul Steve Wynn. Its features include a faux volcano that erupts each night and dolphin and tiger attractions. The Mirage is undergoing a transformation, as Hard Rock International, a New York-based company, plans to buy the casino and turn it into a Hard Rock Las Vegas. Hard Rock plans to open a new guitar-shaped hotel tower and replace the volcano attraction. The Hard Rock Las Vegas resort is expected to open in 2025.바카라사이트

Early betting houses

The first casinos opened in Italy in the seventeenth century. Venice’s Ridotto opened in 1638 and became the first state-sanctioned gambling house in Europe. Various private gambling dens followed. The word “casino” comes from the Italian word for “house,” and many of the casino games are derived from this origin. French explorers also opened their own casinos, which are still popular today.

Early casinos

In the mid-17th century, casinos first appeared in Europe. These gambling houses served as social places for the aristocracy. Some casino games have their origins in the aristocracy, including baccarat.

Early online casinos

The early days of online casinos were rough and unregulated. This led to poor security, and many players lost their money. At the time, there was no encryption technology and no way to protect sensitive information. This made it possible for anyone to hack into the system and steal information. This also allowed people to fraudulently withdraw money from players’ accounts.온라인카지노

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Chinese cold on overseas travel even if COVID curbs ease: survey

More than half of Chinese will put off travel abroad for periods from several months to more than a year, even if borders reopen tomorrow, according to a survey, a sign that consumer recovery from COVID-19 measures will take time. 카지노사이트

Mainland China retains some of the world’s most stringent measures on PCR testing and quarantine for international travellers, despite some domestic easing of curbs after last month’s unprecedented COVID protests.

Fear of infection with the disease was the top concern of those saying they would postpone travel in a survey of 4,000 consumers in China released by consultancy Oliver Wyman, with worries about changes to domestic re-entry guidelines in second place.

“People have become cautious,” said Imke Wouters, a retail and consumer goods partner at the firm. “So even when they can travel, we don’t think they will come back right away.”

As many as 51 percent of those surveyed plan to delay international travel. And when they do, short-haul destinations will be the first to benefit, the consultancy said in its study, “China Consumption Recovery”.

The Asian financial hub of Hong Kong topped wishlists for travel, with 34 percent of respondents saying it would be their first stop after the reopening.

The late October survey followed the 20th Congress of the ruling Communist Party in Beijing, which brought President Xi Jinping a precedent-breaking third term as leader, at an event many had hoped would herald an opening up after COVID.

China was formerly the world’s largest outbound tourism market, but its overseas visitors, who spent $127.5bn on such trips in 2019, have virtually disappeared after it all but shut international borders in early 2020 and curbed non-essential travel by citizens.

China’s uncompromising “zero-COVID” effort hit the economy hard, and it is expected to reshape policies soon, though analysts have warned that any reopening will be bumpy and complex.

As many as 83 percent of the executives in China who responded to the survey said “a long road to consumer confidence recovery” was set to affect their mainland business over the next year.바카라사이트

While the report found consumer sentiment subdued by lockdowns and economic uncertainty, Wouters said Chinese consumers still showed a willingness to boost spending next year if conditions improve.

Nearly half, or 44 percent, of respondents cited an increase in personal savings as a reason they were likely to spend more next year.

China’s household deposits increased to 13 trillion yuan ($1.87 trillion) from January to September this year, up from 8.5 trillion yuan ($1.22 trillion) for the corresponding 2021 period.

Most spending in the next 12 months will focus on personal wellbeing in areas linked to health, fitness or wellness.

The outlier, according to Wouters, was Gen Z, the group born in the period spanning the late 1990s and the early 2010s, which would focus spending on “living in the moment”.

“We don’t expect to see the same boom in luxury spending that we saw in 2021,” she said. “But whatever growth we do see will be driven by Gen Z.” 온라인카지노